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" What may this mean, That thou, dead corse, again in complete steel, Revisit'st thus the glimpses of the moon, Making night hideous; and we fools of nature So horridly to shake our disposition With thoughts beyond the reaches of our souls? "
The Spectator - Page 105
by Joseph Addison, Richard Hurd - 1811
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Cyclopaedia of English Literature: First period, from the earliest times to 1400

Robert Chambers - Authors, English - 1847 - 712 pages
...Wherein we saw thee quietly inurn'd, Hath op'd his ponderous and marble jaws, To cant thee up again ! and we fools of nature, So horribly to shake our disposition With thoughts beyond the reaches of our...
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Cyclopędia of English Literature: A Selection of the Choicest Productions ...

Robert Chambers - English literature - 1847 - 712 pages
...Wherein we saw thee quietly inurn'd, Hath op'd his ponderous and marble jaws, To cast thee up again ! cy, we may be content and thankful ! Let and we fools of nature, So horribly to shake our disposition With thoughts beyond the reaches of our...
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The English Prosody: With Rules Deduced from the Genius of Our Language, and ...

Asa Humphrey - Literature - 1847 - 238 pages
...Wherein we saw thee quietly in-urn'd, Hath op'd his ponderous and marble jaws, To cast thee up again ? What may this mean, That thou, dead corse, again, in complete steel, Revisits thus the glimpses of the moon, Making night hideous; and we fools of nature, So horridly to...
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The American Elocutionist: Comprising 'Lessons in Enunciation', 'Exercises ...

William Russell - Elocution - 1851 - 392 pages
...and pathless ; and the icy earth Swung blind and blackening in the moonless air;" — Amazement : " What may this mean, That thou dead corse, again, In...thus the glimpses of the moon, Making night hideous? " * ERRORS IN INFLECTION. The common errors in inflection, are the following : 1st, too frequent repetition...
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The Life and Beauties of Shakespeare: Comprising Careful Selections from ...

William Shakespeare - 1851 - 408 pages
...Wherein we saw thee quietly in-urn'd, Hathop'd his ponderous and marble jaws, To cast thee up again! What may this mean, That thou, dead corse, again,...thus the glimpses of the moon, Making night hideous; and we fools of nature, So horribly to shake our disposition,* "' .' With thoughts beyond the reaches...
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The dramatic works of William Shakspeare, from the text ..., Part 50, Volume 4

William Shakespeare - 1851 - 586 pages
...Wherein we saw thee guietly inurn'd. Hath op'd his ponderous and marble jaws, To cast thee up again ! What may this mean, That thou, dead corse, again, in complete steel,. Kevisit'st thus the glimpses of the moon, Making night hideous ; and we fools of nature, So horribly...
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Representative Men: Seven Lectures

Ralph Waldo Emerson - American literature - 1987 - 514 pages
...tragedian, was that in which the tragedian had no part, simply Hamlet's question to the ghost, — "What may this mean, That thou, dead corse, again...complete steel Revisit'st thus the glimpses of the moon?" That imagination which dilates the closet he writes in to the world's dimension, crowds it with agents...
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Ulysses Annotated: Notes for James Joyce's Ulysses

Don Gifford, Robert J. Seidman - English literature - 1988 - 704 pages
...is implied as well. 5.455 (83:36). Glimpses of the moon - Hamlet speaks to the ghost of his father: "What may this mean, / That thou, dead corse, again,...the glimpses of the moon, / Making night hideous, and we fools of nature / So horridly to shake our disposition / With thoughts beyond the reaches of...
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Meaning and Being in Myth

Norman Austin - Social Science - 2010 - 280 pages
...marching to war, frowning as he frowned when he smote his enemies? Hamlet, seeing the ghost, is awestruck: What may this mean That thou, dead corse, again in complete steel Revisits thus the glimpses of the moon, Making night hideous, and we fools of nature So horridly to...
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Hamlet

William Shakespeare - Drama - 1992 - 196 pages
...Wherein we saw thee quietly interred,25 Hath oped his ponderous and marble jaws 50 To cast thee up again. What may this mean That thou, dead corse, again in complete steel, Revisits thus the glimpses of the moon, Making night hideous, and we fools of nature So horridly to...
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