Anthropologists in the Field: Cases in Participant Observation

Front Cover
Lynne Hume, Jane Mulcock
Columbia University Press, 2004 - Social Science - 265 pages

All too often anthropologists and other social scientists go into the field with unrealistic expectations. Different cultural milieus are prime ground for misunderstandings, misinterpretations, and interrelational problems. This book is an excellent introduction to real-world ethnography, using familiar and not-so-familiar cultures as cases. The book covers participant observation and ethnographic interviewing, both short and long term. These methodologies are open to problems such as lack of communication, depression, hostility, danger, and moral and ethical dilemmas-problems that are usually sanitized for publication and ignored in the curriculum. Among the intriguing topics covered are sexualized and violent environments, secrecy and disclosure, multiple roles and allegiances, insider/outsider issues, and negotiating friendship and objectivity.

 

Contents

Prostitution Politics
3
Disclosure and Interaction in a Monastery
18
Exploring
46
Ethnographic
59
Bringing
111
Reflections on Fieldwork Among Kenyan Heroin Users
127
Ethical Issues with Prison Ethnography
140
Suicide Friendship and Research
153
Performing and Constructing Research
168
Field Envy and New
185
Multisited Transnational Ethnography and
201
Homework in Australia
216
References
235
Contributors
259
Copyright

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