The principles of English grammar

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J. Lovell, 1864 - English language - 180 pages
 

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Page 73 - Yes ! let the rich deride, the proud disdain These simple blessings of the lowly train ; To me more dear, congenial to my heart, One native charm, than all the gloss of art...
Page 131 - The mean, suspicious wretch, whose bolted door Ne'er moved in duty to the wandering poor ; With him I left the cup, to teach his mind That Heaven can bless, if mortals will be kind. Conscious of wanting worth, he views the bowl, And feels compassion touch his grateful soul. Thus artists melt the sullen ore of lead, With heaping coals of fire upon its head ; In the kind warmth the metal learns to glow, And loose from dross the silver runs below.
Page 171 - The wicked flee when no man pursueth : but the righteous are bold as a lion.
Page 31 - Perfect Tense. Singular. Plural. 1. I have been, 1. We have been, 2. Thou hast been, 2. You have been, 3. He has been ; 3. They have been.
Page 76 - But first, whom shall we send In search of this new world ? whom shall we find Sufficient? who shall tempt with wandering feet The dark, unbottom'd, infinite Abyss, And through the palpable obscure find out His uncouth way, or spread his aery flight, Upborne with indefatigable wings Over the vast abrupt, ere he arrive The happy isle?
Page 72 - The lovely young Lavinia once had friends; And Fortune smiled, deceitful, on her birth. For, in her helpless years depriv'd of all, Of every stay, save Innocence and Heaven, She, with her widow'd mother, feeble, old, And poor, lived in a cottage, far retir'd Among the windings of a woody vale; By solitude and deep surrounding shades, But more by bashful modesty, conceal'd.
Page 33 - They might have been. SUBJUNCTIVE MOOD. Present Tense. Singular. Plural. 1. If I be, 1. If we be, 2. If thou be, 2.
Page 62 - That fortitude which has encountered no dangers, that prudence which has surmounted no difficulties, that integrity which has been attacked by no temptations, can at best be considered but as gold not yet brought to the test, of which therefore the true value cannot be assigned. He that traverses the lists without an adversary, may receive, says the philosopher, the reward of victory, but he has no pretensions to the honour.
Page 160 - The pride of wealth is contemptible, the pride of learning is pitiable, the pride of dignity is ridiculous, and the pride of bigotry is insupportable.
Page 60 - tis true, this god did shake: His coward lips did from their colour fly; And that same eye, whose bend doth awe the world, Did lose his lustre: I did hear him groan: Ay, and that tongue of his, that bade the Romans Mark him, and write his speeches in their books, Alas! it cried, Give me some drink, Titinius, As a sick girl.

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