Essentials in Civil Government: A Text-book for Use in Schools

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American Book Company, 1908 - United States - 224 pages
 

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Page 217 - They joined in desiring him to speak his mind, and gathering round him, he proceeded as follows : — "Friends," says he, "the taxes are indeed very heavy; and, if those laid on by the Government were the only ones we had to pay, we might more easily discharge them; but we have many others, and much more grievous to some of us. We are taxed twice as much by our idleness, three times as much by our pride, and four times as much by our folly; and from these taxes the commissioners cannot ease or deliver...
Page 93 - These wards, called townships in New England, are the vital principle of their governments, and have proved themselves the wisest invention ever devised by the wit of man for the perfect exercise of self-government, and for its preservation.
Page 71 - What constitutes a State? Not high-raised battlement or labored mound, Thick wall or moated gate; Not cities proud, with spires and turrets crowned; Not bays and broad-armed ports, Where, laughing at the storm, rich navies ride; Not starred and spangled courts, Where low-browed baseness wafts perfume to pride. No: MEN, high-minded MEN...
Page 125 - While acting as their Representative, I shall be governed by their will on all subjects upon which I have the means of knowing what their will is ; and upon all others I shall do what my own judgment teaches me will best advance their interests.
Page 50 - THE proudest now is but my peer, The highest not more high ; To-day, of all the weary year, A king of men am I. To-day, alike are great and small, The nameless and the known ; My palace is the people's hall, The ballot-box my throne ! Who serves to-day upon the list Beside the served shall stand ; Alike the brown and wrinkled fist, The gloved and dainty hand ! The rich is level with the poor, The weak is strong to-day ; And sleekest broadcloth counts no more Than homespun frock of gray.
Page 72 - In forest, brake, or den, As beasts excel cold rocks and brambles rude; Men who their duties know, But know their rights, and knowing, dare maintain...
Page 134 - The legislative authority of the state shall be vested in a legislative assembly, consisting of a senate and house of representatives, but the people reserve to themselves power to propose laws and amendments to the constitution and to enact or reject the same at the polls, independent of the legislative assembly...
Page 171 - State is entitled to a number of electors equal to the number of its representatives and senators in Congress.
Page 54 - A weapon that comes down as still As snow-flakes fall upon the sod, But executes a freeman's will As lightning does the will of God ; And from its force nor doors nor locks Can shield you; — 'tis the ballot-box.
Page 197 - Department to foster, promote, and develop the foreign and domestic commerce, the mining, manufacturing, shipping, and fishery industries, the labor interests, and the transportation facilities of the United States...

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