The Magazine of American History with Notes and Queries, Volume 1, Part 2

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A. S. Barnes., 1877 - United States
 

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Page 426 - Sweeps darkly round the bellied sail, And frighted waves rush wildly back Before the broadside's reeling rack, Each dying wanderer of the sea Shall look at once to heaven and thee, And smile to see thy splendors fly In triumph o'er his closing eye.
Page 421 - That on the admission of every new State into the Union, one star be added to the union of the flag; and that such addition shall take effect on the fourth of July next succeeding such admission.
Page 426 - When speaks the signal trumpet tone, And the long line comes gleaming on. Ere yet the life-blood warm and wet, Has dimmed the glistening bayonet, Each soldier eye shall brightly turn To where thy sky-born glories burn, And, as his springing steps advance, Catch war and vengeance from the glance.
Page 425 - For my name and memory, I leave it to men's charitable speeches, and to foreign nations, and to the next age.
Page 501 - Resolved, That a General be appointed to command all the Continental Forces, raised or to be raised for the defence of American Liberty.
Page 426 - Flag of the free heart's hope and home, By angel hands to valor given ! Thy stars have lit the welkin dome, And all thy hues were born in heaven. Forever float that standard sheet ! Where breathes the foe but falls before us, With Freedom's soil beneath our feet, And Freedom's banner streaming o'er us ! JOSEPH RODMAN DRAKE.
Page 410 - ... in the mountain of the height of Israel will I plant it: and it shall bring forth boughs, and bear fruit, and be a goodly cedar: and under it shall dwell all fowl of every wing; in the shadow of the branches thereof shall they dwell.
Page 527 - Army; to take, wherever he may be, whatever he may want for the use of the Army, if the inhabitants will not sell it, allowing a reasonable price for the same; to arrest and confine persons who refuse to take the Continental currency, or are otherwise disaffected to the American cause...
Page 533 - And ever and anon he beat The doubling drum with furious heat; And, though sometimes, each dreary pause between, Dejected Pity at his side Her soul-subduing voice applied, Yet still he kept his wild, unaltered mien, While each strained ball of sight seemed bursting from his head.
Page 406 - And it's oh ! dear ! what can the matter be ? Dear ! dear ! what can the matter be ? Oh ! dear ! what can the matter be ? Johnny's so long at the fair.

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