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" I, stands for one ; V, for five ; X, for ten; L, for fifty ; C, for one hundred ; D, for five hundred ; and M, for one thousand. "
The Common-school Arithmetic: a Practical Treatise on the Science of Numbers - Page 22
by Dana Pond Colburn - 1858 - 276 pages
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A Course of Mathematics: In Two Volumes. For the Use of Academies ..., Volume 1

Charles Hutton - Arithmetic - 1818 - 646 pages
...the alphabet. The Roman* used only seven numeral letters, being the seven following capitals : viz. I for one ; V for five ; X. for ten ; L for fifty ; C for an hundred ; D for five hundred ; M for a thousand. The other numbers they expressed by various repetitions...
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A Course of Mathematics: For the Use of Academies, as Well as Private ...

Charles Hutton - Mathematics - 1822 - 616 pages
...the alphabet. The Romans used only seven numeral letters, being the seven following capitals : vix. I for one; V for five ; X for ten ; L for fifty ; C for an hundred ; D for five hundred : M for a thousand. The other numbers they expressed by various repetitions...
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A New and Easy Introduction to the Mathematics: Containing. A system of ...

Ira Wanzer - Arithmetic - 1831 - 408 pages
...express numbers. The Romans used only seven numeral letters, being the seven following capitals, viz. I for one, V for five, X for ten, L for fifty, C for an hundred, D i'ovfive hundred, and M for a thousand. The other numbers they expressed by various repetitions...
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A system of arithmetic, with the principles of logarithms

Richard Frederick Clarke (the elder.) - 1833 - 158 pages
...Notation was unknown, made use of seven capital letters to express any number required ; namely, I for one ; V for five ; X for ten ; L for fifty ; C for one hundred ; D for five hundred ; M for one thousand. XXV expressed Twenty-five ;— CVIII One hundred and eight; — CCLXI Two hundred...
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An Elementary Arithmetic ...: Serving as an Introduction to the Higher ...

George Roberts Perkins - Arithmetic - 1846 - 266 pages
...of the alphabet. The Romans made use of only seven capital letters, viz. : Ifor one ; V for Jive ; X for ten ; L for fifty ; C for one hundred ; D for fine hundred ; M for one thousand. The other numbers they expressed by various repetitions and combinations...
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Introduction to The National Arithmetic: On the Inductive System Combining ...

Benjamin Greenleaf - Arithmetic - 1849 - 336 pages
...Indian.* ART. 3. The Roman notation employs seven capital letters, viz. : I, for one ; V, for Jive ; X, for ten ; L, for fifty ; C, for one hundred ; D, for five hundred ; M, for one thousand. The intermediate numbers and the numbers greater than one thousand are expressed...
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Introduction to The National Arithmetic: On the Inductive System Combining ...

Benjamin Greenleaf - Arithmetic - 1850 - 346 pages
...Roman, and the Arabic or Indian.* ART. 3. The Roman notation employs seven capital letters, viz. : I, for one ; V, for five ; X, for ten ; L, for fifty ; C, for one hundred ; D, for five hundred ; M, for one thousand. The intermediate numbers and the numbers greater than one thousand are expressed...
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The Practical Model Calculator: For the Engineer, Mechanic, Machinist ...

Oliver Byrne - Engineering - 1851 - 310 pages
...the alphabet. The Romans only used seven numeral letters, being the seven following capitals : viz. I for one ; V for five ; X for ten ; L for fifty ; C for a hundred ; D for five hundred ; M for a thousand. The other numbers they expressed by various repetitions...
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Stoddard's Practical Arithmetic

John Fair Stoddard - Arithmetic - 1852 - 320 pages
...seven following letters to express numbers, which we now use to number Lessons, Chapters, &c. :— I, for one ; V, for five ; X, for ten ; L, for fifty ; C, for one hundred ; D, for five hundred ; M, for one thousand. The intermediate numbers and numbers greater than a thousand are expressed by...
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The practical calculator: a treatise on arithmetic

C W. Thornhill - 1854 - 228 pages
...their numbers by certain letters of the alphabet. The Romans used seven numeral letters, namely, I. for one, V. for five, X. for ten, L. for fifty, C. for one hundred, D. for five hundred, and M. for a thousand. A less numerical letter standing before a greater must be taken from it, as I before V,...
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