American Evangelicals: A Contemporary History of a Mainstream Religious Movement

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Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 2008 - History - 205 pages
There may be no group in American society that is more talked about but so little understood as Evangelical Christians. Sometimes dismissed as violent fundamentalists and ignorant flat earthers, few can doubt the political, cultural, and religious significance of the Evangelicals. Barry Hankins puts the Evangelical movement in historical perspective, reaching back to its roots in the Great Awakening of the eighteenth century and leading up to the formative moments of contemporary conservative Protestantism. Taking on key topics such as the standing of science, the authority of scripture, and gender and racial equality, Hankins analyzes what is most essential for us to understand today about this potent movement.
 

Contents

Awakenings and the Beginning of American Evangelicalism
xiii
The Struggle with Modernism Origins of the Culture Wars
17
Battling with Science From Antievolution to Intelligent Design
47
Millennialism Folk Religion and the Career of EndTimes Prophecy
81
Considering Equality The Tradition of Gender Race and Gay Rights
103
Inspired Politics Evangelical Religion in the Political Marketplace
135
Back to the Academy Evangelical Scholars and the American Mind
161
Conclusion
179
Bibliography
187
Index
193
About the Author
203
Copyright

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About the author (2008)

Barry Hankins is professor of history and church-state studies at Baylor University. He is author of Uneasy in Babylon: Southern Baptist Conservatives and American Culture and God's Rascal: J. Frank Norris and the Beginnings of the Southern Fundamentalism.