Introductory Text-book of English Composition, Based on Grammatical Synthesis

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Page 74 - Grief fills the room up of my absent child, Lies in his bed, walks up and down with me, Puts on his pretty looks, repeats his words, Remembers me of all his gracious parts, Stuffs out his vacant garments with his form; Then, have I reason to be fond of grief ? Fare you well: had you such a loss as I, I could give better comfort than you do.
Page 74 - I HELD it truth, with him who sings To one clear harp in divers tones, That men may rise on stepping-stones Of their dead selves to higher things.
Page 7 - A Dictionary of the English Language, containing the Pronunciation, Etymology, and Explanation of all Words authorized by Eminent Writers. To which are added, a Vocabulary of the Roots of English Words, and an accented list of Greek, Latin, and Scripture Proper Names. By ALEXANDER REID, LL.D., late Head Master of the Edinburgh Institution.
Page 22 - The atrocious crime of being a young man, which the honourable gentleman has, with such spirit and decency, charged upon me, I shall neither attempt to palliate nor deny; but content myself with wishing that I may be one of those whose follies may cease with their youth, and not of that number who are ignorant in spite of experience.
Page 20 - Deterr'd not from achieving what might lead To happier life, knowledge of good and evil ? Of good, how just? of evil, if what is evil Be real, why not known, since easier shunn'd ? God therefore cannot hurt ye, and be just : Not just, not God ; not fear'd then, nor obey'd.
Page 24 - When I see kings lying by those who deposed them, when I consider rival wits placed side by side, or the holy men that divided the world with their contests and disputes, I reflect with sorrow and astonishment on the little competitions, factions, and debates of mankind.
Page 20 - They heard, and were abash'd, and up they sprung Upon the wing ; as when men, wont to watch On duty, sleeping found by whom they dread, Rouse and bestir themselves ere well awake.
Page 19 - Critical Remarks, in which the various Methods of Pronouncing employed by different Authors are investigated and compared with each other.
Page 23 - He that wrestles with us strengthens our nerves, and sharpens our skill. Our antagonist is our helper. This amicable conflict with difficulty obliges us to an intimate acquaintance with our object, and compels us to consider it in all its relations. It will not suffer us to be superficial.
Page 13 - Elements of General History, Ancient and Modern. To which are added, a Comparative View of Ancient and Modern Geography, and a Table of Chronology. By ALEXANDER FRASER TYTLER, Lord Woodhouselee, formerly Professor of History in the University of Edinburgh.

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